MOTION SYSTEM.

Designed for Racing

BRD’s philosophy behind its development of its original V1 motion platform was based on taking a fresh look at what the simulation of open wheel formulae (especially Formula 1) cars required in terms of motion. The market for motion simulators has been dominated by platforms originally designed by and for the aerospace industry.
BRD determined that the nature of the motions designed for simulating aircraft could never ultimately be suitable for open wheel racing cars. Whilst current models have value they are inherently restricted by their construction which limits ultimately their ability to produce accurate motorsport simulation. BRD therefore started from scratch looking firstly at how an open wheel car behaves in the real world and then analysing the mental and physiological cues necessary to create in the mind of the driver a realistic and believable racing experience. It was clear that the most significant aspects of motion for a driver related to the movements and forces in the lateral and longitudinal planes (and critically the rate of change of these forces) and this was the principle focus of BRD with its V1 platform. Fundamentally the V1 is more sophisticated than a traditional motion platform in that all its motions are fully independent giving rise to a much greater degree of control and therefore realism. A traditional platform always requires continual ‘compromise’ of one or more motion vectors in order to create another or more complex motions.

INNOVATIVE DESIGN

BUILT FOR RACING

SUPERIOR QUALITY

INNOVATIVE DESIGN

BUILT FOR RACING

SUPERIOR QUALITY

There is no direct way of comparing our systems with the traditional hexapod type system. They fundamentally were designed for different purposes. Our systems have a set of fully independent motions, eg. if we want to push the back of the car laterally to simulate a slide we can by simply pushing that end of the platform. To create this on a hexapod system requires a complex set of movements of all the motors and joints to generate that movement. When you come to do a more complex motion, eg a lateral slide under braking, again we can simulate the braking and the slide motions completely independently of each other allowing a great range of motion. On a hexapod you need to compromise your slide magnitude in order to also create a braking motion because all the joints are linked. In order to get the range of motion we can generate they need very long stroke lengths on the platform legs, so that the compromise motion equates. This results in large and bulky platforms.
The result of keeping each direction of movement independently controlled means we can create large ranges of movement and at high speed and it is the rate of change of direction that is crucial in simulating the right cues that make the brain believe it is really racing.

Motion System Excursions.

Image
LAYER 3
Front Compound Yaw +/- 0.6m
LAYER 3
Rear Compound Yaw +/- 0.6m
LAYER 2
Sway +/- 0.6m
LAYER 1
Surge +/- 0.6m
Image
LAYER 3
Front Compound Yaw +/- 0.6m
LAYER 3
Rear Compound Yaw +/- 0.6m
LAYER 2
Sway +/- 0.6m
LAYER 1
Surge +/- 0.6m

LAYER 1

Surge (Forwards & Backwards)
Simulate Braking

LAYER 2

Sway (Side to Side)
Simulate Cornering

LAYER 3

Yaw (Compound Twist)
Simulate Understeer & Oversteer